Efficient Railfanning

The Canadian Pacific line north of Lake Superior is very scenic – possibly rivaling their lines through the Rocky Mountains. On our way home from Toronto in late August, I had the opportunity to do a tiny bit of railfanning on the long, long trip home.

Around Marathon, I spotted a westbound container train rolling along. Since we were also going west, there was an opportunity to get ahead of it and get a shot of it.

A week earlier, when we were driving east to Toronto, I spotted a very scenic bridge over the Little Pic River between Jackfish and Marathon. I kept that bridge in my mind and, as it happened, it was a convenient spot to pull off to grab a shot of this CP train.

The Neys Provincial Park is just east of the river and there is a scenic lookout that overlooks the bridge and area. I pulled into there and sprinted over toward the tracks to get the shot. It turned out that I didn’t need to run… but it wasn’t long before the train came along.

CP 8837 and 8572 lead the way
CP 8837 and 8572 lead the way

I had my telephoto lens on my camera and used my phone for the more wide-angle shots.

There were several people taking photos and one young fellow had a drone going.

Crossing the Little Pic River
Crossing the Little Pic River

It’s a significant bridge – at least four spans – and I imagine if you were closer it would be even more impressive.

Now it's the mid-train unit's turn
Now it’s the mid-train unit’s turn

It took several minutes for the train to thread its way through the curves north of Superior.

Maersk on the tail end
Maersk on the tail end

All in all, we were there for less than 15 minutes. That’s efficient railfanning!


The other train I photographed was even more efficient. We were driving toward Kenora, Ontario and I was keeping an eye on the adjacent CP main line.

I spotted a red locomotive ahead and quickly pulled off the highway onto the shoulder. I jumped out and used my phone to capture this eastbound TEC train led by CP 2241.

CP 2241 and a TEST train
CP 2241 and a TEST train

This was near Eagle River, Ontario, a little west of Dryden, where we had stopped for lunch.

The train had CP 2241 leading CP 424959, “Minnesota River”, CP 424993 and CP 63.

The TEC train
The TEC train

I might have been stopped for 90 seconds at most… extremely efficient.

Other Posts From the Trip

4 thoughts on “Efficient Railfanning”

  1. Well done. We passed by Neys in September en route to Sleeping Giant and stopped for lunch, but got skunked! We were originally supposed to spend three nights at Neys in June, but got cancelled as parks weren’t reopened yet, the Sleeping Giant was our fallback. I am definitely going to do several nights in Neys sometime sooner than later to just railfan while my better half sits and relaxes by the campfire!

    Stephen

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