Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway News

NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY B HISTORICAL DATA

Collected by James A. Clowes

Revised To: January 26, 2001 A-164.01

Canada, The Railway and Marine World, Page 249 – April, 1909 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK AND SEABOARD RAILWAY – Application is being made to the New Brunswick Legislature by the Twin Tree Mines Railway, for an act changing the name of the company to the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway, and amending the company’s previous acts, 4 Edward VII Chapter 88, and 8 Edward VII, Chapter 85, by defining Alston Point on the north side of Carron Point, on the south side of the entrance to Bathurst harbour, as the terminus of the proposed railway; by increasing the capital to $1,000,000; by increasing the amount of debentures which may be issued from $250,000 to $500,000, repayable in 30 instead of 20 years, and by repealing Section 14 of the last-mentioned act. The foregoing changes are due to the fact that this charter will he used by the Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, to connect its iron mine up the Nipisiguit River with Bathurst.
Canada, The Railway and Marine World, Page 415 – June, 1909 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK AND SEABOARD RAILWAY – The application of the Twin Tree Mines Railway Company for an act changing its name as above and varying its powers as to the terminal points of its projected line, has been passed by the New Brunswick Legislature. The Canada Iron Corporation, which owns the charter, has engineers in the field locating a line from its mines to the Intercolonial Railway between Newcastle and Bathurst, NB. Three routes are being surveyed, one to near Bathurst, a second to Bartibog, and the third to Red Pine. The point of junction with the ICR has not been decided upon. (April, Page 249.)
The Railway and Marine World, Page 829 – November, 1909 – RAILWAY DEVELOPMENT. – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK AND SEABOARD RAILWAY – We are advised that the portion of this railway now under construction begins at the Intercolonial Railway, four miles south of Bathurst station, and extends up the valley of the Nipisiguit River, 17 miles, to the Canada Iron Corporation’s ore deposits. The gradient is 1% with the load, and the maximum curvature 955 feet. The bridges are of steel, the culverts of reinforced concrete, and the line will be laid with 85-lb. steel rails. Ore will be shipped at Bathurst and Newcastle. Some dredging will have to be done at Bathurst before ore shipments can be made. About one mile below Newcastle, on the Miramichi harbour, the Canada Iron Corporation is constructing ore discharging docks, including trestle approach, a 10,000-ton ore pocket, and an endless bucket conveyor to reach which a line, one mile long being constructed from Newcastle station. J. J. Taylor is engineer in charge. (October, Page 745)
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Provincial Secretary’s Report on Railway Subsidy – 1910 – 1911?

THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY REPORTS FOR THE INFORMATION OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL:-

That the “Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company” has made application for the guarantee of bonds of the said Company under provisions of Chapter 48 of the Acts of the Legislative Assembly 9 Edward the Seventh for an additional amount of $45,000.00 payable on 2.90 miles of the said line of railway necessary to fully complete the same and to connect it with the Intercolonial Railway as set forth in the report of the Provincial Engineer No. 3 dated August 18th, 1910, as follows:-

“Extra lineal miles of grade surface in Drummond Mine yard 2.26

Extra lineal miles of track and grade in Drummond Mine siding to weigh scales .21

Extra lineal miles of track and grade between legs of “Y” at Intercolonial Railway Connection .43

Miles 2.90

That the Provincial Engineer in his report No. 4, October 8th, 1910 says “that such completion work is now all executed, I would recommend that consideration be given to the guarantee of bonds for this additional 2.90 miles, over and above the 16.93 miles of main line, which latter distance has already been reported completed in my report No. 3 of August 18th, 1910.”

The Provincial Secretary taking into consideration the report of the Provincial Engineer, now RECOMMENDS that he may be authorized to guarantee the bonds of the said Company in the further sum of #43,500.00 in the manner and subject to the same conditions as are required by the said Act of Assembly granting such aid, and the Order-in-Council of the 7th day of March last, under which the first guarantee of bonds was made this Company.
And the Committee of Council concurring in the aforegoing recommendation.
IT IS ACCORDINGLY SO ORDERED
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Railway Timetables, Etc. – March 31, 1911

ALL AGREEMENTS CONTINGENT UPON STRIKES, ACCIDENTS AND OTHER CAUSES BEYOND OUR CONTROL

Please address all Communications to the Company
THE NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK AND SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY
Head Office: Bathurst, NB
Bathurst, NB
March 31, 1911

The Honourable,
The Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council,
Province of New Brunswick,
Fredericton, NB

Dear Sir:

We beg to submit herewith for your approval, as covered by the New Brunswick Railway Act, copies of this Company’s Passenger and Freight tarriffs.
Your obedient servants,
The Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway, Company
Superintendent.
THE NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY

Special Freight Tariff No. 1

on

Sundry Forest Products, Coal and Iron Ore, (C.L. only.)

Group No. 1

Slabs, Edgings, Mill Refuse From all points to Nepisiguit Junction, .0134 per 100 lbs. Minimum 30,000 lb.

Group No. 2

Pulpwood, Cordwood, Round Logs, (Rough), Tan Bark From all points to Nepisiguit Junction, .0124 per 100 lbs. Minimum 30,000 lbs

Group No. 3

Deals, Boards, All Sawn Lumber (Excepting Railway ties)
From Bathurst Mines and points East, up to, but not including Wheatons, to Nepisiguit Junction, .044 per 100 lbs.

From Wheatons and points East to Nepisiguit Junction, .024 per 100 lb. Minimum 30,000 lbs.

Group No. 4

Camp Equipment, Household Goods
(Not including Livestock)
Will be carried as fifth class freight from Nepisiguit Junction to Bathurst Mines, and intermediate points, Minimum 20,000 lbs.

Group No. 5

Coal, Iron Ore From Nepisiguit Junction to Bathurst Mines, .254 per Gross Ton.
From Bathurst Mines to Nepisiguit Junction, .254 per Gross Ton.

Group No. 6

RAILWAY TIES

Not over 5 Miles, .01 each

Over 5 Miles, not over 10 Miles .012 each

Over 10 Miles, not over 15 Miles .02 each

Over 15 Miles, not over 20 Miles .022 each Minimum number of Ties to car 500.

(Cars will not be left on main line, or trains stopped, to enable shippers to load Ties.)

Geo. E. Drummond

President

Bathurst, NB, March 21st, 1911.

THE NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY

STANDARD MILEAGE FREIGHT TARIFF No. 1

1911.

Governed by Canadian Joint Freight Classifications and
Special terms and conditions herein, except as to Smalls.

DISTANCES CLASSES IN CENTS PER 100 LBS.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Not exceeding 5 Miles 8 7 6 5 4 4 4 3 3 3
Over 5 Miles, not over 10 Miles 10 8 7 6 5 5 4 4 4 4
Over 10 Miles, not Over 15 Miles 12 11 9 8 6 6 5 5 5 4
Over 15 Miles, not over 20 Miles 14 12 11 9 7 6 6 6 6 5

Smalls.

Minimum Charge 254

Canoes and Row Boats.

Under 20 feet in length, $1.00 each, from or to any point

Over 20 feet in length, $1.50 each, from or to any point

O.R.B.

Moose, Deer, Caribou, or Bear Heads and Hides.

From or to any points, 35 cents each, O.R.

Bathurst, NB, March 21, 1911

Geo E. Drummond, President

THE NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY

Standard Passenger Tariff No. 1

From GRAYS WHEATONS BASIN GREAT FALLS BATHURST MINES
Nepisiguit Junction
Return
10
15
20
30
40
60
45
70
50
75
Grays
Return

15
25
30
45
40
60
45
70
Wheatons
Return


20
30
30
45
35
55
Basin
Return



10
15
15
25
Great Falls
Return




10
15

Geo. E. Drummond,
President

Bathurst, NB, March 21st, 1911.
Moncton, The Daily Transcript, Page 4 – Thursday, March 21, 1912 – SUBSIDY ALLOWED FOR RAILWAY TO MONCTON – $6,400 a Mile Granted For Line From Albert Mines – Ottawa, March 21 – In the new railway subsidies is an item which allows six thousand four hundred dollars a mile to the line from Albert Mines to Moncton, a distance of 22 miles.

Other New Brunswick votes are:- To the Fredericton & Grand Lake Coal and Railway Company for a line form Gibson on the I.C.R. to Minto, together with a branch to Marysville, thirty-five miles.

To the Southampton Railway Company, from Millville to Pokiok Bridge on the St. John River, thirteen miles.

To the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company, near Drummond Mines, Gloucester County, to the I.C.R. and thence to Alston Point or Carron Point., Bathurst harbour, twenty-six miles.

To the North Shore Railway Company for the following lines: one from Adamsville, Kent County to Snowshoe Lake, connecting with the G.T.P. twenty miles; from Beersville via Rexton to Richibucto Head, twenty miles.
Canadian Railway and Marine World, Page 332 – July, 1913 – RAILWAY DEVELOPMENT – Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway – A subsidy not to exceed $6,400 a mile upon the usual conditions, has been granted for the building of the following line in lieu of that voted in 1912:- From Drummond Mines at Austen Brook to the Intercolonial Railway, where it intersects the branch line from Bathurst Station to Bathurst harbour, NB, 16.9 miles. This line is already built to the Intercolonial Railway rather less than 16 miles, and it is to be extended to Bathurst harbour, which is being dredged. The Minister of Railways stated recently that the original subsidy was for 26 miles, but it had been found that better harbour accommodation could be obtained by dredging out Bathurst harbour than by going further on. (October, 1912, Page 502.)
Bathurst, NB, The Northern Light, Page 2 – Wednesday, January 28, 1914 – BATHURST MINES – (Held over from last week) – The train of the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway is still making the regular trips on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturday.
Bathurst, NB, The Northern Light, Page 4 – Wednesday, February 4, 1914 – BATHURST MINES – Our people are anxious to see the Mine resume work, which is expected about the 15th February.
Bathurst, NB, The Northern Light, Page 3 – Wednesday, August 4, 1915 – MOVEMENT ON FOOT TO IMPROVE THE MINES ROAD – LOCAL GOVERNMENT IS TO PAY HALF OF COST AND RESIDENTS OF MINES OTHER HALF – For some time now, ever since the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway decided that its train could run no longer, the little settlement of Bathurst Mines, which a couple of years ago promised to become one of the most prosperous centres of industry in the northern part of the province, has been in a most unfortunate position. This has been brought about by the fact that for about ten miles of its length, what might be called the highway between Bathurst and the Mines is about as much of a road as the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway is a gold mine. So the people who settled at the Mines when it looked as though something was to be doing there, have been left 24 miles in the woods at the dead end of a deader railroad and twelve miles or so from the nearest point that a carriage or automobile could get without turning into an aeroplane. What would have happened to the thirty off families marooned up there had not one of their number, Stanislas Godin by name, been of the stuff of which pioneers are made, it is hard to tell. How he has been able to run a saw mill and cut and ship pulp wood, thus keeping the men of the place employed; persuade the I.C.R. to run an occasional shunter up his way to move the product of his operations; secure a gasoline trolley to carry mail, tourists and himself up and down the two lines of steel that should be carrying tons of iron ore every day, and in fine, keep the life of the place from expiring altogether time after time, – is a question that only builders of empires ever know. The fact remains that largely through his lone efforts, quite a number of people remain at the Mines, and stranger than that, the population and wealth of the settlement are rapidly increasing.

This being so, Mr. Godin sees far enough ahead to realize that it the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway is going to remain indefinitely a dead one, the people under his wing will have to get a highway to come in and go out on, or they reach the same state as the fast rusting line referred to. It is a very hard proposition for any man to tackle, this opening up of a piece of road ten miles long on which there isn’t a sign of human habitation. He knows well enough what the Government will say to him when he asks for something to fix the road with. But he starts with a will by making a good road from the Mines toward town for about four miles. He then finds out that at the other end thirteen miles are good enough for the present, so that leaves about seven miles yet to do. Going carefully over the ground, counting the stumps that stand like Germans on the soil of Belgium, and with the aid of his long contracting experience, he estimates it will cost $1,000 to put that seven miles in some sort of shape. He then lays awake a few nights to see where that money is to come from, and at last makes a start to find it. The first man he interests is Mr. T. M. Burns, whose heart will always have a soft spot for the place that he had a large part in helping to create. Together they go to the Bathurst Lumber Company, and when their interview with Mr. McLean is over, they have a promise of $250 if the Government will contribute $500. Another lumberman agrees to help the work along on the same terms, so now it is time to put the question squarely up to the Government. The local members have lots of sympathy, but that’s about all, and the Government when appealed to finds that the war and investigations and Royal Commissions have made such a hole in the treasury that there is nothing left to take out stumps and fill up real holes with.

Now what is to be done? It would seem that the people of the Mines, who have worked strenuously the last few years to clear and cultivate the land which they occupy, must either tolerate existence there without any regular means of communication with the outside world, or abandon the work which they have accomplished and move themselves and their families to a locality more favoured.

But what about the Government’s duty in their regard? Is it just the right and proper thing to leave these people in their present plight? The Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway was built with its bonds guaranteed by the Government. Its charter calls for continuous operation, and yet it has been allowed to lay idle until such time as its operation may result in an excess of receipts over expenditures. No one finds any particular fault with an arrangement of this kind which staves off the day when the bond interest will have to be paid by the Province, except that it leaves the people of the Mines in a most unfortunate position, and makes impossible the further development of a rich and fertile section of country.

In spite of the discouraging outlook facing the residents of the Mines, they are doing no complaining, but simply going ahead and doing their best with conditions as they are. At the same time, it seems a very little thing for the Government to do, to appropriate the comparatively small sum of $500 for the work required on the highway, – a work that seems the least thing the Government could do to relieve the situation, and from which the benefits will accrue not only to the Mines people, but to many others who would find the road a great value. A fine section of country will be opened up for settlement, the Great Falls, one of the greatest show places in the Province would be open to tourists, fishermen on the river would be greatly convenienced, and Bathurst would feel the benefit in numerous ways.

Now that this matter has been brought to the attention of the public, an exceptional effort should be made to persuade the Government to take action at once along the line suggested.
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Agreement with Saint John & Quebec Railway – May 10, 1918 – THIS AGREEMENT made and entered into this tenth (10th) day of May A.D., 1918 between the St. John & Quebec Railway Company duly incorporated under the Laws of the Province of New Brunswick (Hereinafter called the party of the first part); and the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company, likewise a Company duly incorporated under the laws of the Province of New Brunswick (Hereinafter called the party of the second part), and His Majesty the King represented herein by the Honourable the Premier (HEREINAFTER called the party of the third part).

WHEREAS by an Act of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of New Brunswick, being Chapter 19 of the Acts of 1917, intituled “An Act further respecting the Saint John & Quebec Railway” authority was given the Lieutenant Governor in Council to lift the rails of the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company and to cause the same to be used and dealt with as in said Act provided;
AND WHEREAS the Saint John & Quebec Railway Company has found it difficult, if not impossible, elsewhere to procure rails for its line of railway and desires to avail itself of the authority granted to the Province by said Act for the purpose of procuring such rails from the party of the second part;

AND WHEREAS the Lieutenant Governor in Council has requested the parties hereto to reach an agreement in respect to the compensation to be paid by the party of the first part to the party of the second part for such rails and switch sets to be removed from the property of the party of the second part and in respect to the replacing of the said rails as soon as other rails are procurable and the parties hereto have pursuant thereto reached the said agreement, and His Majesty the King represented as aforesaid has become a party to and executed this agreement for the purpose of guaranteeing the performance thereof by the party of the first part,

NOW THEREFORE THIS AGREEMENT WITNESSETH that for and in consideration of the payments hereinafter mentioned to be made by the said party of the first part to the said party of the second part the said party of the second part agrees that the said party of the first part may enter upon the property, lands and right-of-way of the party of the second part and remove therefrom the rails and switch-sets (as hereinafter defined) and use the same for its own purposes for a period to extend one year beyond the termination of the war, such determination to be determined by the execution of a treaty of peace between Great Britain and Germany, or for such further period as mutually may be agreed upon between the parties hereto. At the expiration of the above period or of such further period as shall be mutually agreed upon the party of the first part shall furnish, replace and relay the said rails and switch-sets in the same manner and in like good order as at present, and to the satisfaction of the party of the second part.

It is mutually admitted that the rails now on the line of railway of the party of the second part are C.P.R. standard eighty-five pounds to the yard.

The party of the first part agrees that the said rails and switch-sets will be replaced with rails of the same weight and character as these removed and of equal quality, provided that is by mutual agreement rails and switch-sets of a less weight are relaid the party of the first part shall pay to the party of the second part the cash value representing the difference, such difference to be determined by the difference in weight between the rails and switch-sets relaid and those taken up and the compensation to be at the rate of fifty dollars per ton. The party of the first part agrees to pay to the party of the second part for the use of the rails and switch-sets interest at the rate of six per cent per annum, semi-annually, on fifty dollars per gross ton of such rails so taken and for switch-sets one hundred and eighty six dollars and sixty-six cents per set, such rental to commence on the first day of June, 1918, and the first payment to be made on the first day of December, 1918, and thereafter half-yearly until the rails and switch-sets have been returned and relaid to the satisfaction of the party of the second part, the last payment to be at such rate pro rata to the time of such completion of relaying.

It is mutually agreed that the weights and quantities of material removed shall be determined by a check made by each party hereto of the first and second parts and that the record signed by the representatives of each party shall be final.

It is further mutually agreed between the parties hereto that in case the party of the first part does not return and replace the rails and switch-sets at the time specified in this agreement or at such later date as mutually may be agreed upon the party of the second part shall have the right to replace such rails and switch-sets by purchasing others and relaying the same and charging the cost thereof and of relaying and replacing the same to the party of the first part.

It is mutually agreed that the rails and switch-sets to be removed under this agreement are all the rails and switch-sets on the line of the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway from Nepisiquit Junction to the property generally known as the Bathurst Mines; also the rails and switch-sets between the Junction at Newcastle with the main line of the C.G.R. and the dock of the New Brunswick Docks & Terminals, Limited, saving and reserving the “Y” at Nepisiquit Junction unless it shall be further agreed that the rails if taken from the said “Y” shall forthwith be replaced by lighter rails satisfactory to the party of the second part, in which case compensation and until repayment interest thereon shall be paid as hereinabove provided on the difference in weight of such rails at the rate of fifty dollars per ton.

AND WHEREAS the party of the third part has guaranteed the payment of the Bonds of the party of the second part and it is desirable that the interest paid hereunder shall be applicable to the payment of interest on such bonds.

NOW THEREFORE THIS AGREEMENT FURTHER WITNESSETH that the party of the second part hereby agrees with the party of the third part that the party of the first part shall pay the rental or interest and all other moneys to be paid hereunder into the Bank of British North America at Montreal, PQ., to the credit of the party of the second part to be applied by such Bank to or towards the payment of the interest on such guaranteed Bonds.

AND THIS INDENTURE FURTHER WITNESSETH that the party of the third part in consideration of the premises hereby guarantees the performance by the party of the first part of all and singular the obligations, terms and condition herein contained by the said party of the first part to be performed and agrees with the party of the second part that they shall be performed by the said party of the first part during the life of this agreement in manner and form as herein provided.
It is further agreed that in case of a difference arising between the parties hereto as to any of the items herein contained or any matter or thing to be done hereunder such difference shall be settled by arbitration under the New Brunswick Arbitration Act.

It is hereby agreed that the word “Rails” wherever used in this agreement shall mean and include rails, braces tie-plates, spikes, bolts and angle bars and the words “Switch-sets” wherever herein used shall mean and include all the switch-sets, switch-stands, spilt rails, frogs, etc., of the said line of the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties hereto of the first and second parts have caused their respective corporate seals to be hereunto affixed and this agreement to be executed in their respective names by their proper officer in that behalf the day and year first hereinabove written, and the party of the third part has caused these Presents to be executed under the seal of the Province of New Brunswick by the Honourable Walter E. Foster, Premier of the said Province.

The corporate seal of the Saint John & Quebec Railway Company was affixed hereto in the presence of: C. O. Foss

The Saint John & Quebec Railway Company
per W. P. Jones

President
E. S. Carter,
Secretary-Treasurer, Saint John & Quebec Railway Company

The corporate seal of he Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company was affixed hereto in the presence of: E. J. O’Brien

W. E. Foster
Premier

The Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company

V. J. Hughes
Vice-President

Andrew Whyte, Jr.
Secretary-Treasurer
Canadian Railway and Marine World, Page 458 – September 1924 – RAILWAY BETTERMENTS – Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway – A press report states that Angus McLean, of Bathurst, NB, waited on the New Brunswick Government recently in connection with a project for re-opening the iron ore mines near Gloucester, NB, which were operated some years ago by the Canada Iron Corporation. The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway was built in 1910, for the shipment of the ore from the mines at the junction of the Austin Brook with the Nipisiquit River, the contractors being Wheaton Brothers. The line ran from the old Intercolonial Railway at Nipisiquit Junction to the mines, 16.41 miles, and a spur of one mile was built from the I.R.C. at Newcastle, NB, to the ore dock, so that ore trains could be taken alongside steamships. Mining operations having been stopped, the company sold its rolling stock and other equipment in 1917.
Canadian Railway & Marine World, Page 558 – November 1924 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK AND SEABOARD RAILWAY – In connection with the reported project to reopen the Gloucester iron ore mines, and to re-operate the railway line from Nipisiquit Junction, on the old Intercolonial Railway, to the mines, we are advised that the rails were not removed from the line, as was at one time reported, but it is not being operated. Plans for re-opening the mines have not yet been definitely settled. Angus McLean, President of the Bathurst Company, Bathurst, NB, is interested in the project. (September, Page 458)
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Agreement with Saint John & Quebec Railway – July 16, 1925 – Agreement made this 16 day of July A.D. 1925 between Angus McLean of Bathurst in the County of Gloucester, manufacturer, and the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company incorporated under the laws of the Province of New Brunswick (hereinafter called the parties of the first part) of the first part and the St. John & Quebec Railway Company (hereinafter called the party of the second part) of the second part.

Whereas by an agreement dated the 10th day of May 1918, the party of the second part was authorized to take up the rails on the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway and agreed to replace the same under certain terms and conditions set out in said agreement.

And whereas the said rails were taken up and used on the St. John & Quebec Railway between Gagetown and Westfield. And whereas the St. John & Quebec Railway Company has agreed with the parties of the first part, that they, the parties of the first part, will replace the said rails on the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway and will be compensated by the party of the second part has hereinafter mentioned.

Now this agreement witnesseth that the parties of the first part hereby agree with the party of the second part, that they, the parties of the first part, will secure rails and relay the same as above mentioned and furnish all materials and do all the work which is necessary to be done in the relaying of the said rails under the agreement aforesaid dated the 10th day of May 1918.

The party of the second part agrees to compensate the parties of the first part for the rails so to be relaid and the work necessary to be performed in the relaying of the said rails according to the provisions of the said agreement of the 10th of May 1918. The amount of such compensation is to be agreed upon when an engineer to be appointed by the parties of the first part, and the chief engineer of the St. John & Quebec Railway Company and if it should so happen that the said engineers should fail to agree to agree in respect to any particular items, they shall name a third engineer and determine the amount of compensation in respect of such items and decision of such third engineer shall be final and conclusive between the parties as to the amount of such compensation.
The compensation is to be paid from time to time as the work advances, on progress estimates to be approved by the engineer of the St. John & Quebec Railway Company.

It is understood and agreed that the parties of the first part will furnish the materials and for the work to the satisfaction of the said chief engineer and in compliance with the obligations, of the St. John & Quebec Railway Company, under the said agreement of the 10th of May 1918, and a certain amount of the compensation above mentioned which in the opinion of the chief engineer would be sufficient to insure the final completion of the said work shall be held back until such final completion of the work.

In witness whereas the said Angus McLean has hereto set his hand and the Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company has caused this agreement to be signed by the said Angus McLean, and their behalf and the St. John & Quebec Railway Company has caused this agreement to be signed by the President and chief engineer the day and year first above mentioned.

Angus McLean

Executed in the presence of
Kathleen Shea

B. M. Hill
St. John & Quebec Railway Company
Canadian Railway and Marine World, Page 582 – October, 1927 – NIPISIGUIT RAILWAY – We are advised officially that it is proposed to extend the old Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway from near the Gloucester mines, about 16 miles from Nipisiguit Junction, one mile east of Bathurst, for about 30 miles, to Indian Falls, where a storage dam is to be built. This extension, which is being made by the Bathurst Company, Limited, of which Angus McLean is President, will give the railway a total length of 46.9 miles, with an entrance to Bathurst and the navigable water there. The company proposes to develop a water power at Indian Falls on the Nipisiguit River. The Nipisiguit Railway’s charter gives it power to acquire the N.N.B. and S.R. and to extend it along the Nipisiguit and Tobique River Valley, to Plaster Rock. It is intended to proceed with the construction of the line from the Gloucester mines to Indian Falls immediately. (September, Page 532)
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Report of A. D. Holyoke – May 1, 1933

To The Honourable
The Provincial Secretary-Treasurer:

Sir,

In the matter of the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company, Limited, and in the matter of default in interest payments on the Bonds of the said Railway Company.

Acting on your instructions I have made a partial investigation into the above matters, and beg to submit my report as follows:

The Bonds of the above named Company to the amount of Two Hundred and Ninety-seven Thousand Dollars were issued dated the First day of January, 1910, for a period of Thirty Years, with coupons attached, bearing interest at the rate of four per cent. per annum, payable on the First days of July and January in each year. The Bonds, which were first guaranteed by the Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, were guaranteed by the Province of New Brunswick as to Principal and interest, in accordance with and in pursuance of several Orders-in-Council passed on the 7th day of March, 1910; the 13th day of July, 1910; and the 30th day of September, 1910.

The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, first guarantors on the Bonds, went into liquidation in 1913, and the assets of the Company were taken over by Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, a Company apparently organized for that purpose. Just what right in law His Majesty The King may now have as against the liquidators of the Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, or against the present holders of the assets of that Company is a matter for the consideration of the Department of the Attorney-General.

Just here I would call your attention to a matter that may prove of some future importance. The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, did hold, and The Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, now hold, one square mile of land at the site of the old Drummond Mines on which the mine buildings were erected. These buildings have since been destroyed by fire and all the machinery removed from the place. This square mile of land has very little value under present conditions, but in the event of development at some future time of the vast iron deposits located in that district, that particular square mile of land would play a very important part in any negotiations that may be entered into by the Government of this Province with any other Company or Corporation in an effort to have the deposits properly developed and mined.

The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company defaulted in the interest payments due on July 1st, 1932, and again on January 1st, 1933, and there is every reason to believe that the default will continue during the balance of the term of the Bonds, and the Province will be called on to pay the interest each year, and finally retire the Bonds at maturity, January 1st, 1940, unless some development takes place in that district that will greatly increase the earning capacity of the Railway. Later in my report I will take occasion to refer to this possibility.

I was unable to find the Mortgage, covering the Bond Guarantee, given to His Majesty The King, acting by and for the Province of New Brunswick. While in Bathurst I spent some time in taking a copy of the Mortgage from the Gloucester County Records, and I am attaching the same to this report. You will note that under the terms of the Mortgage the Province has the right, upon default in payment of interest or principal, if such default continues for a period of ninety days, to take over the total assets of the Company and sell the same, under certain conditions as to publication of notice. You will also note that the Mortgage covers “all of the line of railway, franchises, stations, right-of-way, rolling stock tolls, income and equipment, both that which it now owns and that which it may hereafter acquire”.

Assets of the Company

The Book Assets of the Company total $602,317.00, made up of plant and equipment, right-of-way, etc. The only items that have any saleable value at the present time are the rails, angle bars, and turn-outs. These items are all in good condition and could probably be sold to realize from $35,000.00 to $40,000.00. There are about 192,000 lineal feet of 80 lb. rails, and something over 4,000 lineal feet of 85 lb. rails, or approximately 2,285 tone of 80 lb. rails, and 55 tons of 85 lb. rails, together with 7,000 pairs of angle bars, and a number of 85 lb. turn-outs.

Some years ago Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, removed all the rolling stock then used on the railway, including locomotive and freight cars. The rolling stock, all bore the name of “Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway”. I have not yet been able to ascertain what became of the freight cars. The locomotive was sold to the Intercolonial Railways for ($21,000.00) Twenty-one Thousand Dollars. These items were all covered by the Mortgage given to His Majesty The King.

Matters for Consideration

In arriving at a decision as to the proper course of procedure under the circumstances there are some features that should be carefully considered:

(a) The Railway is being operated when necessary and is receiving sufficient revenue to pay all operating expenses as well as up-keep, and the road bed is kept in good condition.

(b) The mill of J. R. Anderson, which was destroyed by fire in 1931, has been rebuilt and is dependent on the Railway to a great extent for transportation purposes.

(c) There are several families located on the line of Railway that depend entirely upon its operation for transportation.

(d) It is used to some extent by tourists and sportsmen as a means of transportation to and from fishing and hunting camps.

(e) The probability of future development of the iron deposits known as the “Drummond Mines”, or “Bathurst Mines”.

The latter phase of the situation, i.e., resumption of the development of the iron deposits in that district, would seem to present the only solution of the financial difficulty in connection with the Railway.

A great deal of information in the matter of the iron deposits at Austin Brook is on file in the Department of Lands and Mines, but this is by no means complete as it deals only with known conditions previous to the renewal of the mining leases to Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, in 1928. Since that time it seems there is evidence of rather important changes in conditions, which, if borne out in fact, would make a decided difference in operating conditions of the property today as compared with the known conditions during the former operation.

According to some authorities the problem of securing a continuance of the supply of iron ore in the United States is causing serious thought. It is claimed that the “Lake Ores” will be exhausted in another year, or two years at the most, and that the efforts to locate additional deposits in the State of Michigan and elsewhere have not been very successful; and unless some other source of supply is found in the near future it will be necessary to import ore at a greatly increased cost.
There is also the matter of ore conditions at the Drummond Mine. It is now claimed that there is a vein of high grade ore on this property varying from six to eight feet in width, with sufficient area to keep the mine in successful operation for many years. Mr. Cyril Young, of the C.N.R. Research Department, has reported that a quantity taken from this vein assayed from 52 to 56 per cent.

There would seem to be ample justification for the Minister of Lands and Mines to proceed under the authority given to his by an added clause (a) in the renewal lease granted to the Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, under Order-in-Council dated July 31st, 1928, a copy of which is attached hereto. If this mode of procedure is adopted I am satisfied that it will be followed in a very short time by an effort on the part of Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, to resume operation of the mine. In the event of the Company not starting to operate the mine, or giving to the Minister a satisfactory undertaking to do so, as provided in the Lease, the Province will be in a position to cancel the lease and seek elsewhere for some Company or Corporation that will agree to operate it, and this should not be very difficult to find if conditions in the iron industry during the next one or two years work out as at present indicated.

With the resumption of operation of this property the Province would be relieved of the payment of interest on the Bonds, as in that event the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway would have an earning capacity more than sufficient to take care of its bonded liability.

Recommendations

Taking into consideration all the features referred to, I recommend as follows:

1. Because of the comparatively small amount that would probably be realized from the sale of the assets of the Company, that no steps be taken to foreclose the Mortgage at present, but that the Railway be allowed to continue as at present operated.

2. That Mr. G. P. Ruiskbie, of Bathurst, NB, Secretary of Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway, be requested to make periodical reports to the Provincial Secretary-Treasurer as to the operation of the road, with a detailed report of amounts expended from time to time in upkeep and replacements.

3. That the Minister of Lands and Mines be requested to notify Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, present owners of Mining Leases Nos. 120A, 121, 122, 123, and 124, to operate the mine, such notification to be based on the authority given the Minister by an added clause in the renewal lease granted under an Order-in-Council dated July 31st, 1928.

4. That in the event of Canada Iron Foundries, Limited refusing to operate the Mine, and the licenses above referred to are cancelled, consideration be given to the mode of procedure, if any, to be adopted in order to secure for the Province from the said Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, a transfer of the square mile of land at Austin Brook hereinbefore referred to.

5. That in the event of Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, refusing to operate the mine consideration to given to the possibility of securing from them an accounting in regard to the Rolling Stock removed by them from the line of Railway, and payment to the Province of the sum of Twenty-one Thousand Dollars, the amount received as the sale price of the Locomotive to the Intercolonial Railway, together with interest on the same from the date of default in interest on the Bonds by the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway.

All of the above is respectfully submitted.

Dated at Fredericton, NB, this First day of May, 1933.

A. D. Holyoke
Copy of Order-in-Council

The Honourable The Minister of Lands and Mines Reports for the Information of the Committee of the Executive Council:

That the Canada Iron Foundries, Limited present proprietors of Mining Leases 120A, 121, 122, 123, and 124, situate near Bathurst, and which were issued by the Crown on the 4th of September, 1908, for a period of 20 years subject to renewal on certain conditions having been complied with, duly petitioned the Crown in accordance with the terms of the leases that the said leases be renewed for the second period of 20 years, beginning 4th of September, 1928.

That although one of the conditions requisite to said renewal in accordance with the terms of the leases was that the lessees should at the time of the notice desiring renewal, be working the area under lease, through unavoidable circumstances of which the Minister is cognizant, the said lessees are not carrying out that condition of the leases. The Minister nevertheless now recommends that the said leases be renewed for a period of 20 years beginning 4th of September, 1928, subject to the following conditions to be inserted in the renewal of the lease:

(a) Provided that if at any time during the currency of this renewal the Company is not operating the Mine, and the Minister of Mines has grounds for believing that the Mine could be operated at a profit, then the Minister shall have the right to give the Company notice in writing to operate the Mine. And if within twelve months from the date of said notice the Company has not commenced to operate the Mine, or has not given an undertaking satisfactory to the Minister to operate it within a time and in a manner satisfactory to the Minister, then the Minister shall have the right to declare the leases cancelled at the expiry of twelve months from the date of the original notice as aforesaid.

(b) The Minister shall also have the right at any time during the currency of the leases to give authority to other parties to enter on the property for the purpose of investigating the Mine and to carry on drilling operations for that purpose for a reasonable time. Providing that the Minister before conferring such authority on other parties shall give the Company one month’s notice in writing of his intention to do so. Provided also that if the Company shall at any time commence and continue to operate the Mine to the satisfaction of the Minister, or shall have given an undertaking satisfactory to the Minister under the preceding clause that it is preparing to operate the Mine; then the right to allow entry to other parties under this clause shall be suspended during the period of such operation.

And the Committee of Council concurring in said report and recommendation.

IT IS ACCORDINGLY SO ORDERED.

Passed July 31st, 1928.
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Report on Railway’s Status – March 4, 1943

March 4th, 1943

DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY-TREASURER

Report and Recommendation to the Executive Council

Report: Information has come to hand advising that iron ore is being taken and evidently transported over the old Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway line. The Company which is taking out about ten (10) cars loads of ore per day has gone ahead and spent some considerable money in fixing up the road but without the sanction of the Province, who own this line. The Province guaranteed the payment of the bonds on this line which were redeemed on January 1st 1940 and the Province paid some $328,000 in payment of the bonds plus the U.S. premium and an Act was passed in 1942 making this property, both real and personal of the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company vested in the Crown in the right of the Province of New Brunswick free and clear of all encumbrances and of all claims of any and all persons whomsoever. It would seem that this matter should be investigated immediately by either officials of the Lands and Mines Department or the Public Works Department.

Recommendation: That this matter be referred to the Executive Council for consideration.

Approved:

Deputy Provincial Secretary-Treasurer

Provincial Secretary-Treasurer

NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK AND
SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY

By Chapter 88 of the Acts of Assembly, 1904,

The Twin Tree Mines Railway Company was incorporated for the purpose of constructing and operating a railroad “from the Twin Tree Mines, near Great Falls on the Nepisiguit River in the County of Gloucester, to Gloucester Junction.” The Act of 1904 was amended by Chapter 85 of 8 Edward VII (1908) and again amended by Chapter 87 of 9 Edward VII (1909) changing the name of the Company to “The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company” and the termini of the railroad “from Drummond Mines, at Austin Brook, a branch of the Nepisiguit River above Great Falls, in the County of Gloucester, to a point on the Intercolonial Railway, and from such point to Alston Point, on the north side, or to Carron Point on the south side of the entrance to Bathurst Harbour in the said County, a distance in all of twenty-six (26) miles, more or less …..” By the last mentioned Act the Company was authorized to issue bonds to an amount not exceeding $500,000.00

By Chapter 48 of the Acts of 1909 the Governor-in-Council was empowered to guarantee the principal and interest of the bonds of The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company to a sum not exceeding $15,000.00 per mile of railroad nor for more than twenty-six (26) miles. The rate of interest on such bonds not to exceed four per centum per annum and the principal to be payable in not more than thirty years from date of issue. Section 2 of said last mentioned Act provided that: “The Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council may, by Order-in-Council, direct the Provincial Secretary to endorse upon such bonds, after the guarantee of The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, a guarantee of the principal and interest thereof; such guarantee to be signed by the Provincial Secretary, and when such guarantee is endorsed thereon, the Province shall be liable to pay the principal and interest thereof to the holder or such bonds.”

It was further provided be Section 5 that The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company should give to the Province by way of security a mortgage upon “said line of railway, franchises, stations, right-of-way, rolling stock, tolls, income and equipment” and it was further provided by Section 6 that before the guarantee of the Province should be endorsed on the bonds “the said Company” (The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company) “shall procure the same to be first endorsed and guaranteed by The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited.”

By three Orders-in Council dated March 7th, 1910, July 13th, 1910 and September 30th, 1919, the Governor-in-Council authorized a guarantee of the bonds of The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company to a total amount of $297,450.00 (Copies of Orders-in-Council attached).
On December 20th, 1909 a Trust Agreement was made and executed by The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company, the Montreal Trust Company, The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited and the Province of New Brunswick. By said Agreement the Province guaranteed to the Montreal Trust Company “the due payment of the principal and interest thereof” (the bonds) “as they respectively mature.” It was further provided that having first given thirty days written notice to the guarantors the Trust Company could demand and collect the amounts due from the guarantors but no proceeding were to be instituted against the Province until demand of payment had been made upon The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, which demand the Corporation had failed to meet within thirty (30) days after such demand. (Copy of Trust Agreement attached).

The guarantee of the Province was endorsed on bonds to the amount of $297,000.00 in the following words:

“The Province of New Brunswick guarantees to the lawful holder of this Bond the payment by The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company of the principal of said Bond and the interest accrued thereon and as it accrues. (Signed) J. K. Flemming, Provincial Secretary.”

The bonds contained the following: “For Value Received The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company, a corporation duly incorporated and existing under the laws of the Province of New Brunswick in the Dominion of Canada, acknowledges itself indebted and hereby promises to pay to the Bearer hereof, or, if registered, then to the registered holder hereof the sum of Five Hundred Dollars in Gold Coin if demanded of or equal to the present standard of weight and fineness at the office of the Bank of British North America in the City of Montreal, Canada, New York, U.S.A. or London, England …..”

also

“it is further subject to the terms and conditions of the Deed of Trust in favour of the Montreal Trust Company, of Montreal, Canada, the whole as will by reference to said Deed of Trust more fully appear and which Deed of Trust is hereby referred to for the nature and extent of the security, the rights of the holders of the bonds so secured and the terms and conditions upon which the said bonds are issued, and which rights, terms and conditions are made part of this Bond.”

In 1913 The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, was placed in liquidation under the Dominion Winding Up Act and in 1915 a new Company, Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, was formed and took over all the assets and undertaking of The Canada Iron Corporation, Limited, the creditors of the latter Company receiving shares in Canada Iron Foundries, Limited. The Province never filed any claim for its contingent liability under the guarantee of the bonds and by Order-in-Council dated July 1st, 1925, specifically released the liquidators and Canada Iron Foundries, Limited, from any liability in relation to the guarantee and any contingent claim arising out of same.

The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company paid the interest on the bonds up to and including January 1st, 1932. Commencing July 1st, 1932, up to the present time the Province has paid the interest on the bonds. There is no doubt that the Company will default as to both interest and principal due on January 1st, 1940 and the Province will be called upon to fulfil its guarantee. An Act was passed in 1939, Chapter 10, authorizing an issue of debentures for the purpose of redeeming said bonds.

In 1933, Mr. A. D. Holyoke investigated the situation regarding The Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company and made a report containing certain recommendations to the Provincial Secretary-Treasurer. (Copy of report attached).

The question now arises as to what currency these bonds are payable in if presented for payment in New York or London.

According to information received from the Department of the Provincial Secretary-Treasurer, about $155,000.00 of these bonds are held by the City Treasurer of the City of Halifax. There in at present no information as to where the balance is held. Some very small proportion of interest coupons has been paid in American funds by the Province in the past.

The first very important question to be determined is under what law the terms of the contract and its performance is to be interpreted. There are four possibilities, the law of New Brunswick, Quebec, New York or England.

In Rex versus International Trustee, 1937, A.C. 500, a case decided in the House of Lords, Lord Atkin said the proper law to apply to the construction of a contract is the law which the parties intended to apply. This intention will be ascertained by the intention expressed in the contract, if any. If no intention be expressed the intention will be presumed by the Court from the terms of the contract and the relevant surrounding circumstances.

In New Brunswick Railway Company versus British and French Trust Corporation, 1939, A.C. page 1, the majority of the Court of Appeal held “that ‘the proper law of the contract’ contained in the bonds and interested coupons was Canadian, but that the clause providing for payment in London must be interpreted and have effect by reference to the law of England, and that the obligations of the appellants (New Brunswick Railway Company) in regard to such payment, were not affected by the Canadian Act.” The majority of the Court in the House of Lords refrained from expressing and opinion on this point, Lord Maugham, L.C. saying at page 25: “The answer would depend on the view taken in this particular case as to the intention or presumed intention of the parties. Opinions on the matter may differ.”

The bonds themselves do not contain any expression of intention of the parties as to what law shall govern. According to Rex versus International Trustee this point
would have to be determined from the terms of the contract and the relevant surrounding circumstances.

If an action were brought in the Courts of New Brunswick, section 1 of Chapter 45 of the Acts of 1939 would apply and the contract interpreted without reference to the Gold Clause. If an action were first brought in a Court outside of the Province any action to enforce a judgement in a Court in New Brunswick presumably would be governed by Section 2 of the 1939 Act. There still remains the question whether the bonus are payable in Canadian or American dollars, if presented in the United States. If payable in American dollars, upwards of $30,000 over and above the face amount of the bonds would be required.
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Letter About Use of Railway – August 6, 1958

Bathurst Power & Paper Company Limited

Bathurst, NB

August 6, 1958

The Honourable J. Stewart Brooks,

Minister of Public Works,
Provincial Government Buildings,
Fredericton, NB.

Dear Mr. Brooks:

Re: The Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company Limited

By permission confirmed by Order-in-Council we have been using the railway line of the above Company from Nepisiquit Junction to Great Falls on the Nepisiquit River, the site of our hydro electric power development. This development is tied into the electrical transmission grid of the New Brunswick Electric Power Commission by reciprocal exchange agreement.

Our use of the rail line is confined to the patrol and maintenance of our 33,000 volt transmission line. We operate the patrol by gasoline driven trolleys.

There is approximately 18 miles of track consisting of 80 lb. rails. The trackage is now impassable. In the event of future acquisition and use of the rail line by the mining interests, complete recondition and heavier rails would be necessary.

During the First World War the rails and ties were removed due to wartime necessity and the use of the same elsewhere. The road-bed was levelled and the bridges planked for passage of vehicles. In our opinion the amount realised on account of the salvage of the present rails would at least compensate or show a profit for the other collateral work of levelling, grading and the repair of bridges, etc., so as to provide a road-bed capable of use by motor vehicles.

We would appreciate it if you would consider our requests that either:

(1) your Department undertake the lifting of the rails, ties, grading and levelling of the road and repair of bridges, or,

(2) that you assign to us ownership of the rails and other related materials on condition that we undertake the removal and salvage of the rails to our own account, and the grading and levelling of the road-bed and repair of bridges, etc., and in such case it is to be stipulated that the road-bed itself remain the property of the Crown and subject to use by the public.

As the project must be carried out prior to the onset of winter, if at all, we would appreciate if we could have your early decision.

Yours very truly,

Bathurst Power & Paper Company Limited

J. G. Chalmers,
Resident Director.

P.S. Hand written note on letter: 2,500 tons @ Net $10.00 per Ton = $25,000, or for 18 miles $1390 per mile.
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Letter About Removing the Rails – November 24, 1958

November 24, 1958

Bathurst, R.R. # 3

Gloucester County, NB

The Honourable J. S. Brooks,

Minister of Public Works,
Fredericton, NB.

Re: The Northern New Brunswick & Seaboard Railway Company

Dear Mr. Minister:

According to information which I have the Province is considering the lifting of the rails and the grading of the roadbed to provide a highway from Nepisiquit Junction to Great Falls on the Nepisiquit River.
I am interested in doing this work and I hereby offer you the sum of $5,000 under the following conditions:

(a) You assign to me ownership of the rails and other related materials;

(b) I will undertake the removal and salvage of the rails and will grade and level the road-bed and repair the bridges.

I trust you will have an opportunity to consider this proposal in the very near future and would appreciate hearing from you as soon as possible.

Yours very truly,
Donald E. Hicks.
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Letter About Removing the Rails – December 4, 1958

Minister of Public Works
Fredericton, NB.

December 4, 1958

Mr. Donald E. Hicks.

Bathurst, R. R. # 3

Gloucester County, NB

Dear Mr. Hicks:

This is to advise that the Minister has accepted your offer for lifting the rails and the grading of the roadbed in order to provide a highway from Nepisiquit Junction to Great Falls on the Nepisiquit Rive in accordance with he terms submitted by you.

You are to advise when you will commence the work and I would ask that you submit $250, which would represent 5 per cent of the sum offered, as evidence of your good faith.

The work is to be done to the satisfaction of our District Engineer, Mr. L. A. Cassie, and the balance of the amount due the Department to be paid within 30 days after the completion of the work.
Yours very truly,

Minister of Public Works,

Per R. Palmer,
Deputy Minister

c.c. to W. W. McCormack
R. W. Manzer
J. A. Mersereau
L. A. Caissie
Fredericton, N.B. – Provincial Archives – RS 22/33 – NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK & SEABOARD RAILWAY COMPANY – Letter Concerning the “Y” at Nepisiquit Junction – August 26, 1959

Canadian National Railways

Office of Superintendent

Campbellton, NB

August 26, 1959

Our File: 5540-13

7400-190

Department of Public Works,

Province of New Brunswick,

Fredericton, NB.

Gentlemen:

Advice has been received that the Department of Public Works is presently removing all rail from the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway, more commonly known as the Nepisiquit Branch.
On checking our records, I find that Agreement No. 11695 is presently in effect with the Northern New Brunswick and Seaboard Railway Company, whereby the Canadian National Railways are allowed to operate over both legs of the wye and 200 feet of tail track.

It would be appreciated, therefore, if you would instruct your Contractor not to remove the tracks covered by the above noted agreement, as they are needed especially during the winter season to turn our ploughs and flangers.

Will you please confirm that the necessary action will be taken, and ensure the tracks in question will not be removed.

Yours truly,

C. A. Berube
Superintendent

 

J. A. Clowes

– End of File –